Wooden Duck Boat

Over the last couple of years, I have gotten into duck hunting. There is something about the water, birds, and the variety that both bring to the hunting experience that I have really come to appreciate. You get to pull theends glued trigger more than once and it is certainly a challenge and humbling experience. I’ve heard a lot of waterfowl hunters say they are more bird watchers than hunters and that has certainly become true in my life.

While you don’t have to hunt waterfowl over water to have success I find that water brings more beauty to the experiences. I had a lot of fun building my last boat and I knew that I wanted to build another boat if I had a chance. This is my chance. On my last boat I used the a design a friend made. This time I have created my own design. Obviously, the design is not that original or unique. You can do a simple search on the web and find plenty of boats that will look similar to mine. The main concerns I had for the boat were stability, size, and concealment. I wanted the boat stictchingto be stable and safe in the water. I wanted the boat to easily hold me and my gear and yet allow for one man to move it around. Finally, when I’m out hunting you need to conceal yourself and so I wanted to basically be able to turn the boat into a layout blind.

The last two of months, I came up with a design and made a model. I was able to find some marine grade plywood at a local store. I purchased the epoxy and cloth on amazon. Dad and I were able to cut out the pieces. I am using a technique called stitch and glue and so I stitched the pieces together with wire and zip ties. I hadfully assembled to laminated the pieces together to form and strengthen the ends. These were glued and then screwed together to get a good tight seal. The holes from the screws and wires will be plugged at a later date with thickened epoxy.

Once stitched the pieces together and the walls were spread apart to create the desired shape, I then started to glue the pieces together with epoxy. The corners and stitching detailcracks were filled in and then cloth was placed over the seam to strengthen the joints. I applied a couple more layers of epoxy over the cloth to fill in the pits. The next step will be to sand down the epoxy and glue in the ribs that will strengthen the shape. After that I’ll put in a false floor with foam sandwiched between the bottom and floor for floatation.  The false floor will also be very flat and comfortable to lay down upon.reinforcement corner

Post Categories: Hunting and Outdoors, The Wooden Boat Project
Comments
  • KAREN BLACK says:

    HI FATHER AARON, GLAD TO SEE YOU’RE STILL HUNTING AND ENJOYING DOING THINGS WITH YOUR DAD… DO YOU STILL HAVE SOME BEE HIVES??? IF I DON’T SEE YOU ON HERE I WISH YOU AN EARLY HAPPY BIRTHDAY…

  • KAREN BLACK says:

    HI FATHER AARON, GLAD TO SEE YOU ARE STILL HUNTING AND BUILDING ANOTHER BOAT..I AM ALSO HAPPY THAT YOU ARE CLOSE ENOUGH TO GET TO DO THINGS WITH YOUR DAD… ARE YOU WORKING WITH BEES ANYMORE?? I ENJOYED THE HONEY WHEN YOU WERE HERE.. I’LL BE THINKING OF YOU ON THE 5TH AND WISH YOU HAPPY BIRTHDAY…

  • Russ Jenkins says:

    Nice design and it will be a great boat for goose pond.
    It’s always fun to see what you come up with.

  • Cindy Foote says:

    Nice, you are always doing something interesting. Glad you enjoy building boats.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *