The wooden boat

3-10-13 Almost done. My father worked on the benches and the oar locks this week. He put a few clear coats on the wood and the red oak really looks great. We started to screw the benches onto the hull. We need to get some smaller screws for the middle bench as the combination of a not so tight fit and the angle of the side conspire to make the screws go in a little weird. I stained the gunnels so that they are closer in color to the red oak. These will be clear coated by dad during the coming week. He will also cut out and clear coat some oak plates for the transom so that a motor has something to grip and oak will hold up better to the clamps. We tested out the oarlocks with the seat to make sure their position was good and also to let me know where I need to wrap the leather around the oars to make them quitter to row. I also cut out mats for the floor. These of course will help keep the boat quiet, help us stay out longer with less fatigue, and also protect the floor. I then worked on the bow. I added the rope that will be used as a tie it down. I also painted a design and the name on the bow and also placed a cross of St. Benedict at the top. I also cut out some boards that I hope […]

The Wooden Boat Project

3-4-13 This week I flipped the boat upside down and painted the Hull. I put three coats on after I primed it. You can see more flaws in the boast after you paint but overall I’m still happy with it. Not much else to report other than I started the paper work to get the trailer and boat registered. Next week we will put the seats in and install the oar locks. I will most likely work on making the casting platforms and cutting the mats for the floor and maybe do some work on the trailer.  

The wooden boat

2-25-13 This week I started priming and painting the boat. I gave one good last look over on the sanding and hit a couple of spot that were bad. I then cleaned up the inside, wiped it down and got it prepped for the primer. The primer was a two part epoxy primer. At first my plan was just to cover the epoxied areas on the inside and then use another primer for the bare wood but I decided just do the entire inside with one primer to make it simpler. Once the primer was on I hit it with some sandpaper and cleaned it up again and then started applying the paint. The paint was a little glossy for my taste but that’s the way it goes. Most of it will be covered up with anti-fatigue matting. It took two coats of paint to get the coverage I wanted. After this was complete and it dried up a bit. I opened up the hull paint and used it to cover the bow and the edge. This gave me a good idea of how it will look when it is complete. The only other interesting thing was the fumes from this paint and primer. It was overwhelming and a bit hard to work with because it is still chilly outside so I had to heat up the place then paint and open up the windows and doors and blow the fumes out with a fan. There was one point I could actually […]

The Wooden Boat

  2-18-13 It looks like a boat and I can see the end. This week brought more sanding but it was at least interesting as it involved shaping. Most of this was on the bow. There was a lot of epoxy between the side and gunnels so I sanded and shaped it down as well as the top of the bow. It really turned out well. I had to fill in some pits here and there but it looks good. I then sanded down the rest of the gunnels and worked on the stern. Once the boat was flipped right side up and I sanded the corners of the chines and the ribs a little more. These areas are still a little rougher than I would like but I’m done with them. I also built up some epoxy in the back because the walls did not line up with the gunnels very well. So once that was built up I sanded it down to match the walls and the gunnels. After the sanding and shaping was over Dad and I worked on making the benches. He went and bought some really nice red oak some of it was almost twelve inches wide. All of it was almost an inch thick. So this stuff is sturdy and will certainly hold me and a few of my friends. All of them turned out to be varying widths which is a little odd but gives it some character. We are also going to […]

The Wooden Boat

  2-11-13 Back to sanding, and it’s worse because it is sanding epoxy, hard stuff that tends to gum up the sandpaper. I had to sand the entire bottom so that including the keel as well. I shaped the keel on the bow and stern and got it to match the sides pretty well. I then had to smooth and sand so that there was no longer any shine. This is because the primer needs to have something to grab ahold of. When I did this I noticed some flaws, like small pits from bubbles that I think occurred because the temperature increased as the epoxy setup. I added a little epoxy to fill them in so Ill have to sand that down next week. I also sanded a little too much in some spots so I started to see the glass cloth. I don’t think this will ruin it but I’d rather not see it at all. There were a couple of really rough spots so I used some pretty abrasive sandpaper to get it down then used 80 grit to do the overall sanding. Once this was done Dad and I flipped the now heavier boat and we worked on adding gunnels to the sides. These were sixteen foot 1×4 pine. They went on pretty well except at the bow. On the rest of the boat we simply clamped it to the wall with a healthy dose of epoxy, then screwed it from the inside to really get […]

The Wooden Boat

2-5-13 I took an extra day off this week for three reasons; first it’s my birthday, second Lent starts next week, and third the boat is ready for fiberglass. I really wanted to make sure that I have days to work on this part since I’ve never done it before and I know that it takes a few coats of epoxy. I’ve seen this done a couple of ways. First is the dry method which means you put the cloth on the boat then saturate it with epoxy. This is the way I did the tape on the chines on the inside of the boat it took a tone of epoxy and a lot of time. The problem with doing this on the outside of the boat is the sides. Trying to keep the cloth on the side and saturate it seemed impossible so I went with the wet method. This method has you applying the epoxy to the surface of the boat then unrolling or draping the cloth onto the side. This worked well. I could stretch and pull the cloth in spots and really didn’t have many spots that I needed to cut the cloth to make it lay right. It took some working but it laid down well. I found that the cloth saturated much faster than the tape, mostly because it was thinner than the tape. I put the cloth on both sides and cut it so that it overlapped the corners by about four inches. I then […]

The Wooden Boat Project

1/21/13 I really don’t like sanding, especially in the tight corners of a boat. I again sanded the corners and joints trying to smooth them out and make them nicer not only for looks but also cleaning after trips. Lots of work with 60 grit sandpaper. After a couple of hours I got them to the point that I was at least satisfied for now. I’m sure later I’ll go back in and do a better job but it is tedious work and not that much fun. I did go back in with more thickened epoxy in the corners of the ribs and sides because they were two pitted and just plain ugly. I also flipped the boat and sanded down the outside and smoothed and shaped the prow. I was pretty happy with how this turned out. I flipped the boat back and drilled two holes at the top of the prow. My friend (flatswalker) suggested that I put in some copper or brass pipe to make it nice and smooth for the ropes so that’s what I did. I bought some nice strong 5mm rope to use. The original design for the boat only had one hole for the rope I wanted to have two so that when it was retracted back into the boat it would simply be a smooth bump so that it would be less likely to catch the fly line. It was also time to attach the boards that the benches will sit on. […]

The Wooden Boat Project

1-14-13 This week I continued with my work on the chines, which is the joint of the side and floor. Last time I laid down the thickened epoxy, fiber glass tape, and more epoxy. The mistake I made was to put thickened epoxy back over top of the fiber glass tape. It was so thick that it was hard to get smooth. So when I went to sand this week I could see that it was going to take a lot of work. I decided that instead of sanding it down to add more thickened epoxy in the hope that it would help even it out. I did have to sand all of the epoxy so that the new epoxy would stick to the old. This should make it better but my guess is that I will have to do this again next week. With the help of my father and one of his coworkers we flipped the boat. I was amazed at how light it was and how sturdy if felt. It was a pretty cool felling. I then spent the rest of the day clipping off the plastic zip ties and working to remove the wire ties. The plastic ties clipped easy and sanded down just as fast as the wood so they presented no problem. It was a little more involved process to get the wire out of their holes as they were glued in. I clipped the top side of the wire close to the bottom of the boat I […]

The wooden boat project ch2

1-7-13 After I celebrated the Epiphany masses and three baptisms I headed back to my parents’ house and my Dad’s workshop to work on my boat. Before New Years I had stitched the boat together and then put the first of many coats of epoxy on the seams. Today I renewed the gluing process by thickening up some epoxy and putting it into the seams and rounding out the corners. Then I placed 3” fiber glass tape on top of that thickened glue and then soaked the tape with epoxy. Soaking the tape with epoxy took a tremendous amount of glue and I had to go back and work with the brush and push the glue into the tape in certain spots that just didn’t want to take the glue. I made sure to smooth it out the best I could. I then let this dry until it became tacky. I put another layer of slightly thickened glue on the seam and tape again. And let it dry until tacky. I wasn’t satisfied with the seams and my friend recommended that I thicken up the corner seam. So that’s what I did. This again took a lot of glue and was pretty tedious as it was very thick. Imagine trying to stir peanut butter about 20 times. I then smeared it in the corners and smoothed it out. If I had to do it all over again I would have put this under the fiber glass tape because I think it would look a little better […]

The Wooden Boat Project -ch 1

So it’s hunting season and I am thinking about fishing. It never fails. I’m never satisfied. So while I’m sitting in the stand and looking for deer I’m thinking about fishing. A friend of mine, the guy who really showed me how to fly fish, built this boat from no plan other than a picture in his brain. . It’s really nice and pretty amazing because it easy to stand up in and can be used both on lakes and rivers. In other words it’s just what I’m looking for. I’ve done some research and it does look like other boats out there and a “Ghenoe” would be something very similar to what I’m looking for although I don’t think a “Ghenoe” would do the river and the “massive”to put some meat in the freezer and maybe a rack on the wall I’m thinking about warmer days looking for fish in water. I’ve always dreamed of building a boat and this summer I found the one to build. Indiana rapids as well as this boat I’m planning to build. Plus my thought process finally led me to the point that I knew that I will always want to build a boat and so why not do it now. I have the space and I guess the time. Plus my friend is still alive, so I can bug him on how its done. I’m calling it project Pisces, Latin for fish (plural). I’m no expert on Latin; one class that I all but flunked in seminary does not […]